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Cenotaph Titling is an engraved-style titling free font which draws reference from inscriptions done by Eric Gill – most notably in the vertical stem in the ‘U’. In OpenType format it contains 10 discretionary ligatures useful for stylistic and practical spacing purposes, as well as 3 alternate ampersands and proportional old style numerals. This first iteration of the typeface is free for personal and commercial use.

Big thanks to Lewis McGuffie for providing us this free font. Make sure to check out more awesome designs at his website.

: OTF (OpenType Font)
: 10.3 KB
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Responses (4)

  1. Ian
    11:14 am · Reply

    I am grateful for the free download of Cenotaph font. I note however that the discretionary ligatures and variations are not included. This is unfortunate as they add to the unique style so much. Oh well, many thanks anyway, appreciate the offer.

    Regards,

    Ian Morton.

    • Marty
      10:20 am · Reply

      I opened the font in Fontforge, and I can see all the discretionary ligatures and the alternate ampersands, but I don’t know how to get them into a document. They really are included, but they’re unusable.

      • Marty
        10:40 am ·

        I use a Mac. I tried several word processing apps, and when I got to Pages I could choose Format, Font, Ligature, Use All and I got the discretionary ligatures. I still don’t know how to get the alternative ampersands. What you get out of the font depends on how good your software is.

  2. Marty
    9:59 pm · Reply

    On a Mac — where all my software, including the OS, is up to date — TextEdit can do ligatures just like Pages (see my previous comment) but not alternate glyphs. Inkscape (free, runs under XQuartz, buggy) can’t do ligatures, but it can show “all glyphs” (that is, all the glyphs that have Unicode numbers) and append any of them, including the alternate ampersands as well as a few special graphics (but not the ligature glyphs, which are not in Unicode). Copying and pasting text from TextEdit to Inkscape loses the ligatures, but copying special and alternate glyphs from Inkscape to TextEdit works.

    So, with some outrageous effort, you can access all the features of the font. Or you can pay for Adobe Illustrator, which does it all in one place.

    That’s in Mac OS X. Your Windows may vary.

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